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Chester County's Wyebrook Farm Offering One-of-a-kind Gift for the Holidays

This holiday season, farmer Dean Carlson is pleased to offer Farmer’s Gift Baskets of his fresh, humanely raised Beef, Pork and Poultry from Wyebrook Farm (150 Wyebrook Road, 610-942-7481). Featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer’s annual gift guide, Farmer’s Gift Baskets are $75 for seven pounds of assorted fresh and cured meats from the farm, packed in a thermal bag and available for pick-up at the farm itself, as well as every Tuesday throughout December from downtown’s Green Aisle Grocery (1618 East Passyunk Avenue, 215-465-1411) and Cook (253 South 20th Street, 215-735-2665).

Guests who are interested in purchasing a Farmer’s Gift Basket, either as the foundation for an entire holiday season’s worth of meals or as a thoughtful and unusual gift for cooks and food lovers, should email info@wyebrookfarm.com for more information. Customers can also view Wyebrook’s complete product and price list on their website and then order their meats from info@wyebrookfarm.com.

“There is no match for the flavor, tenderness and nutritional properties of heritage-bred animals, raised with respect and without unnatural pesticides and antibiotics, patiently grown to their full potential and humanely butchered right here at the farm,” says Carlson, a hands-on farmer. “Our Farmer’s Gift Baskets bring the finest beef, poultry and pork directly to our customers, ensuring that they’ll serve a holiday feast that will be remembered for years to come.”

The baskets include an assortment of: Grass-Fed Steaks; Heritage Pork Chops; Farm-Fresh Eggs; and Cured Meats such as pastrami and bacon, chef-crafted in Wyebrook’s Farm Kitchen. Guests are encouraged to visit the farm to pick up their baskets and also shop Carlson’s selections of produce, cheese and more from similar-minded neighboring farms. The Wyebrook Market remains a one-stop shop for exceptional local food products.

Carlson’s cows, pigs and chickens thrive in a free-range environment without the use of pesticides, antibiotics or growth hormones. Cattle breeds, including Devon and Red Angus, live on a diet of grass and legumes, and Carlson evaluates their rib eye for superior quality using an ultrasound machine. Pigs, including purebread Ossabaw and Tamworth, are bred for their skill at foraging and incomparable taste, resulting in more flavorful pork that bears little resemblance to what is raised on industrial farms. Chickens, from the French Label Rouge program, are a breed called Freedom Rangers, and like all Wyebrook animals, they live up to the name, grazing widely across the property protected by movable fences.

Wyebrook Farm offerings change throughout the year, based on availability, with the best interests of the animals and their environment in mind. Featured selections, as determined by the natural constraints of traditional farming include everything from just-laid eggs to a wide variety of meats, including popular cuts such as T-Bone Steak, Pork Tenderloin and Chicken Breast as well as specialty cuts such as Oxtail, Pig’s Ear and Chicken Liver.

“Our animals enjoy life here at the farm, and we encourage our guests to visit us and learn more about the origin of their food before they take it home,” says Carlson.

In addition to his responsibilities as farmer, Carlson operates Wyebrook’s Farm Market at Wyebrook Farm. Housed in one of the restored stone barns on the property, the Farm Market is open every Friday from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. The Farm Market occupies the top floor of the barn, and is stocked with a seasonal array of Wyebrook beef, pork and poultry, as well as produce, cheese and other fine products from nearby farms, making it a one-stop shop for discerning guests looking to bring home the area’s best farm-raised foods. Throughout the weekend, guests are invited to linger, getting to know the farm staff and understand what sets their products apart.

Since Carlson purchased Wyebrook Farm in March 2010, he has worked on extensive renovations to the property’s stone houses and barns. He also initiated several eco-conscious improvements to the buildings and farm equipment, including: over 50Kw of solar panels that provide much of the farm’s electricity; the conversion of cooking oil into biodiesel to power the tractors and other vehicles; and a rainwater capture system that feeds a pond, which provides irrigation for the apple orchard and other landscaping. Today, the formerly foreclosed land, once slated for a 100+ house residential development, is a vibrant example of how grassroots agriculture can re-energize a community and lead the way for residents and visitors alike to make healthier choices in their diets.

For more information about Wyebrook Farm’s Farmer’s Gift Baskets, please email info@wyebrookfarm.com. You can also call (610) 942-7481, visit www.wyebrookfarm.com, follow them on Twitter (@WyebrookFarm) and like them on Facebook.

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